The hacked emails of Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign chairman John Podesta have been making headlines. So have leaked emails from the Democratic National Committee. Cybersecurity has been a major issue in the presidential campaign with wide ranging implications for both national security and private information.

Image of John Cohen
John D. Cohen, distinguished professor of professional practice in criminal justice and senior adviser to the Rutgers Institute for Emergency Preparedness and Homeland Security. Cohen formerly served as Acting Undersecretary for Intelligence and Analysis at the United States Department of Homeland Security.

Rutgers Today spoke with John D. Cohen, a distinguished professor of professional practice in criminal justice and senior adviser to the Rutgers Institute for Emergency Preparedness and Homeland Security, about how we should react to these threats. Cohen was formerly Acting Undersecretary for Intelligence and Analysis at the United States Department of Homeland Security.

In the past year, we’ve heard that the Democratic National Committee emails were hacked and that the email system used by the Joint Chiefs of Staff at the Pentagon was hacked. Yahoo recently acknowledged a breach. Why is this happening?

Cohen: The continuing drum beat of high profile breaches show that the cyber threat environment continues to evolve and expand. Government and private sector entities must deal with the growing likelihood that their systems will be compromised and sensitive data contained within will be extracted and utilized to support intelligence collection and/or other criminal activity. These trends reflect the growing use of cyberattacks by nation states such as Russia, China, Iran and North Korea to project global influence – essentially through the use of cut-out hacking groups to wreak havoc or steal sensitive economic, national security and other information in furtherance of geo-political goals.

Read more here.

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