Scientists Identify Biological Pathway that Could Explain Why Asthma Therapies Are Ineffective

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Scientists Reynold A. Panettieri, inaugural director of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute at Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences, and Edward E. Morrissey, director of the Penn Center for Pulmonary Biology, Perelmen School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, have identified a biological pathway that could explain why current asthma therapies often prove ineffective. The discovery has the potential to lead to new treatments for many of the 25 million people in the U.S., including seven million children, who suffer from the chronic condition.

Read the full story here.

Preventing Alzheimer’s Disease in African Americans by Strengthening the Brain

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Zumba class at New Hope Baptist Church in Newark, New Jersey

A major effort is underway to reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia for older African Americans. Neurologist Mark Gluck of Rutgers University-Newark is leading a team that will use a five-year $1-million grant from the New Jersey Department of Health – obtained through a competition among states for funding from the Department of Health and Human Services – to teach people how to protect their brains through exercise.

“African Americans have twice the rate of Alzheimer’s disease as compared to the broader population,” says Gluck, a professor at the Rutgers Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience and co-director of Rutgers’ African-American Brain Health InitiativeGluck and his team hope to demonstrate how exercise improves memory and cognitive vitality, reducing people’s risk for Alzheimer’s disease.

Read the full story here.

Register Now: The 2016 Annual Retreat on Cancer Research in New Jersey

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Registration is now open for the Annual Retreat on Cancer Research in New Jersey’s public forum, which will focus on “Cancer Survivorship,” on May 26 from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the College Avenue Student Center, Rutgers University–New Brunswick. The event will feature speakers from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, who will discuss couple-focused group therapy, post-treatment self-care, and more. The session is free but registration is required. Learn more and register here.

Rutgers Day 2016

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Explore, learn, and play at Rutgers Day 2016! Whether you’re a first time guest or a frequent visitor, we invite you to get reacquainted with our great university and have some fun along the way with music, dance, hands-on activities, games, and demonstrations hosted by accomplished professors, students, and staff.

This year marks the 250th anniversary of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, and also coincides with Alumni Weekend, hosted by the Rutgers Alumni Association at all three regional locations of Rutgers University–Camden, Rutgers University–New Brunswick, and Rutgers University–Newark. All Rutgers University parking lots are open and FREE.

To keep up with regular updates, visit us on Facebook.

For more information, visit the Rutgers Day website.

 

Heart and Liver Disease Linked to Antioxidant Shutdown

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Rutgers scientists have discovered that a protein (p62) which is supposed to prevent cell damage is not working efficiently in laboratory mice with heart and liver disease. Wei-Xing-Zong, a professor in the Department of Chemical Biology in the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy and leader of the study, said the damage occurred because another protein, (TRIM21) – which should activate the body’s response system to fight off bacteria and virus – did the opposite in these seriously ill mice and shut the antioxidant protein down, preventing it from doing its job.

Read the full story here.

Indoor Tanning: When Women Reflect on Reasons They Tan, Tanning Bed Use Decreases, Rutgers Study Finds

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A Rutgers study of 186 women at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey examined the impact of a website intervention to discourage indoor tanning behavior. The study, which appears in the current online issue of Health Psychology, was unique because it didn’t lecture the women on the harmful effects of ultraviolet radiation – researchers assumed users were already aware of the dangers – but rather on the mindset surrounding tanning.

“We’re trying to encourage tanners to think about their tanning and why they’re doing it,” said lead author Jerod L. Stapleton, behavioral scientist at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and assistant professor of medicine at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.

The research found that women who viewed the website were more likely to stop using tanning beds compared to women not asked to reflect on their behavior.

Read the full story here.

NIH’s LabTV Profiles 10 Young Rutgers Researchers

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A new NIH LabTV series, The Human Faces of Medical Research, has profiled Rutgers young researchers. The LabTV Rutgers channel features video profiles of professors, graduate students and an undergrad who are working in the laboratories of Lauren Aleksunes, Zhiping Pang, and Anand Sarwate.

Read the full story here.

Rutgers Licenses Promising Mechanism for Treating Cancer to Company Associated with BioMotiv

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Dr. Darren Carpizo (Photo by Jody Somers)

BioMotiv, a drug-development accelerator associated with The Harrington Project, has created a new biotechnology startup company, Z53 Therapeutics, to discover and develop new agents for the treatment of p53-dependent cancers using a technology from Rutgers University. The company has licensed intellectual property that originated in the laboratory of Darren Carpizo, M.D., Ph.D., at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey with the discovery that small molecules can act as zinc metallochaperones to shuttle zinc across cell membranes and reactivate mutant p53. As part of his drug discovery research, Carpizo established collaborations with scientists from Rutgers Translational Sciences and in the lab of Stewart Loh, Ph.D., at SUNY Upstate Medical University.

Read the full story here.

Biotech Startup Earns $500,000 Commitment from Foundation Venture Capital Group, with Rutgers Grad Students as CEO and Chief Science Officer

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Visikol Founders Seated, from left, Prof. James Simon and Michael Johnson.
Standing, from left, Nick Crider and Tom Villani. Photo by Peter Byron

Visikol Inc., a student-run biotech startup from Rutgers University–New Brunswick that markets a technology platform for use in scientific and medical research, has earned a $500,000 commitment from Foundation Venture Capital Group, which announced its investment yesterday, February 23. Visikol sells a versatile clearing agent, which is a chemical formula that renders tissues transparent, allowing researchers to effectively visualize biological tissues in 3-D, as opposed to the traditional slicing based 2-D visualization approach. This approach saves time, reduces structural damage to samples, and enables more information to be gathered from tissues.

Read the full story here.

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