Rutgers Panelists: Increasing Awareness, Ending Stigma Is Critical in Addressing Perinatal/Postpartum Depression

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dsc_0210An article from Robert Wood Johnson Medical School opens the conversation about something many women experience: perinatal/postpartum depression.

As many as one in seven women experience postpartum depression, according to a study in JAMA Psychiatry; but despite its frequency and the overwhelming success rates of treatment, the vast majority of women—up to 85 percent—receive no professional treatment for the condition. Experts at a recent forum on perinatal/postpartum depression say a change is long overdue, calling for increased awareness among women and clinicians, advocacy, and systemic changes in the approach to collaborative treatment.”

Read more here.

Depressive Symptoms More Likely for Older Adults with Elderly Parents Still Living, Rutgers Study Finds

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“People who have reached age 65 with living parents are more likely to suffer depressive symptoms than their peers whose parents have died, according to new research by Rutgers sociologist Deborah Carr.

In addition, adult children who may have been abused or neglected by their parents are especially vulnerable to depressive symptoms, both when at least one parent is alive, and when a parent dies.

‘Older adults adjust fairly well to the death of a parent, especially a parent who lived a full life,’ says Carr, a professor of sociology in the School of Arts and Sciences. ‘But that’s if they had a close, warm, supportive relationship with the parent. But if they had a difficult childhood and were neglected emotionally, they have a much tougher time, both when the parent is alive and when the parent dies.'”
Read more here.

Rutgers University Libraries Receives Grant to Digitize Important Historical New Jersey Newspapers

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“The New Jersey Digital Newspaper Project is a collaboration of Rutgers University Libraries, the New Jersey State Archives and the New Jersey State Library that will make the history of New Jersey known to its citizens and the world. The plan, according to project director and Rutgers University digital archivist Caryn Radick, is to scan existing microfilm from the New Jersey State Archives and to make searchable digital files available through the Library of Congress website Chronicling America. Over a two-year period, the project will digitize and catalog at least 100,000 newspaper pages, originally published between 1836 and 1922 and not currently available in digital format.”

Read more here.

From Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey (RCINJ): “Cutting Off the Cancer Fuel Supply”

Science Springs

Rutgers University
Rutgers University

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Cancer Institute of New Jersey

August 10, 2016
Michele Fisher
732-235-9872
michele.fisher@rutgers.edu

Research from investigators at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Princeton University has identified a new approach to cancer therapy in cutting off a cancer cell’s ‘fuel supply’ by targeting a cellular survival mechanism known as autophagy. Rutgers Cancer Institute Deputy Director Eileen P. White, PhD, distinguished professor of molecular biology and biochemistry in the School of Arts and Sciences at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, and Rutgers Cancer Institute researcher ‘Jessie’ Yanxiang Guo, PhD, assistant professor of medicine at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, are the co-corresponding authors of the work published in the August 10 edition of Genes & Development. They share more about the research, which focused on lung cancers driven by the Kras protein:

Q: Why is this topic important to explore?

A: Between 85 to 90 percent…

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Nobel Prize Winner in Physics to Present Public Lecture at Rutgers

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A Nobel Prize-winning scientist who helped pioneer the energy-saving LED light bulb is presenting a public lecture August 29 in an event organized by Rutgers University.

Shuji Nakamura, who shared the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics, will speak on the past, present, and future of lighting in a lecture titled: “From Edison Lightbulb to Blue LED Lighting.”

The event, hosted by the Department of Physics and Astronomy, School of Arts and Sciences, is free and open to the public and begins at 7 p.m. at the George Street Playhouse in New Brunswick.

Read more about the event here.

Rutgers Medical Student Competing as a Swimmer in the Rio Olympics

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“Nothing could have kept Anastasia Bogdanovski from the first week of classes at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School and the White Coat Ceremony that marks the official beginning of a medical education – except a chance to compete in the Rio Olympics.

Bogdanovski, who has represented Macedonia in international swimming competitions over the past several years, will swim her first race August 8 at noon (EST) for the Balkan state in the 200-meter freestyle race at the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. She holds several records in Macedonia, a successor state of the former Yugoslavia that declared its independence in 1991. Both her parents were born in Macedonia, and she is a dual citizen.”
Read more here.

Targeting Brain Cells to Alleviate Neuropathic Pain

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“Neuropathic pain – which affects more than 1 million Americans – could be reduced or even eliminated by targeting brain cells that are supposed to provide immunity but, in some instances, do the opposite, causing chronic pain that could last a lifetime.

In new research, published in both Nature Communications and Cell Reports, Wu and his team discovered that chronic neuropathic pain – caused by nerve damage as a result of an injury, surgery or a debilitating disease like diabetes or cancer – could be greatly reduced in animals if the injury was treated by targeting microglia within a few days.”

Read more here.

Why Tossing the Floss is a Bad Idea

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“The dental world was left reeling last week after the federal government declared flossing –  touted for decades as a bedrock of oral health care – isn’t scientifically proven to fight plaque.

The news came to light after the Associated Press invoked the Freedom of Information Act to demand scientific evidence of flossing’s benefits. Government officials revealed that 25 studies on flossing produced “weak” and “unreliable” results. Although since 1979, flossing has been recommended under the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, it’s now off the list. Not so for the American Dental Association, and the American Academy of Periodontology, which continue to recommend flossing.

Most dentists still swear by it, like Andrew Sullivan, chair of the Rutgers School of Dental Medicine’s Department of Periodontics. Sullivan treats many patients who suffer from periodontitis, an advanced form of gum disease that deteriorates bone, resulting in pain and tooth loss. He explained to Rutgers Today why tossing the floss is a bad idea.”

Read more here.

Milestone: 200th Molecule of the Month!

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“The 200th installment of the RCSB PDB’s Molecule of the Month series has been published.  August’s feature on explores how viruses use quasisymmetry to build large capsids out of many small subunits.
Since January 2000, this series has explored the structure and function of biomacromolecules from AAA+ Proteases to Zika Virus. Each installment includes an introduction to the structure and function of the molecule, a discussion of the relevance of the molecule to human health and welfare, and an interactive 3D view.
New features are published each month at RCSB PDB and PDB-101, with an archive of articles translated into Japanese available at PDBj. The full archive of articles provides a powerful tool for exploring biology.

Written and illustrated by David S. Goodsell, a research professor at Rutgers University, the Molecule of the Month has provided an easy introduction to the RCSB PDB for teachers and students around the world. Materials from the series have been used by many textbooks, magazine and journal articles, and other publications. His image of Ebola Virus Proteins was selected as the overall winner of the 2016 Wellcome Image Awards and highlighted by the FASEB BioArt Competition.

The Molecule of the Month article on Quasisymmetry in Icosahedral Viruses can be accessed here.
Several resources have been published at PDB-101 to help celebrate this milestone:
* Use the Quasisymmetry in Icosahedral Viruses activity page to build 3D paper models of several viruses to explore how quasisymmetry builds capsids with different sizes.
* In the poster 200 Icosahedral Viruses from the PDB (PDF), 200 icosahedral virus structures from the PDB are arranged and colored by the number of protein chains in each capsid.
* The Coloring Molecular Machinery Coloring Book highlights a subset of the many diverse structures featured by Molecule of the Month articles over the years. Download the full book or individual pages to start to color. Post completed images online with the hashtag #colormolecules, or send them toinfo@rcsb.org to be posted on RCSB PDB’s Facebook page.”

Read more here.

Rutgers University Dental Associates heal patient shot in face

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Great story found at NJ.com about how Rutgers University Dental Associates helped Samuel Nyamwange, a psychologist who immigrated from Kenya, restore his facial function after being shot during a robbery.

“Nyamwange survived, but the bullet shattered his teeth and jaw and destroyed the roof of his mouth. In addition to coping with facial disfigurement, he couldn’t eat or speak and suffered from chronic facial pain. He was convinced he would never be able to live a normal life. “I lost hope,” said Nyamwange, 55.”

Read more here.

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